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Doubleweave Throw Weave-Along

For the first time, I shipped my sample projects for a teaching gig instead of hand-carrying them. Everything arrived safely and I had a grand time teaching new weavers to weave. The host and I carefully packed everything up and shipped it back.

When the box arrived, all seemed well enough, although the box seemed a little light. As I unpacked it, I noticed a few things missing, and then I saw the bottom of the box. It had been crushed and re-taped—about half the projects were missing! Apparently, there had been a train derailment (I’m told no one was hurt), and during the ensuing chaos, a bunch of my projects decided to make their escape.

Doubleweave ThrowI imagined them jumping from the train to pursue their dreams—the Brook’s Bouquet shawl hitched a ride with the nearest limo; the Simply Striped Rug flew off to find adventure; and the doubleweave throw is having a nice picnic somewhere with the color-and-weave towels.

After a deep sigh and a few adult beverages. I’m made a list of the projects that I need to reweave. I’m starting with the doubleweave throw from Double Your Fun and I invite you to weave-along with me.

Yarnworker Weave-Along!

Are you ready to weave your first (or third, fourth, fifth) doubleweave throw? Join me and the gals at Cotton Clouds for a weave-along. If this is your first time tackling two heddles, enjoy the camaraderie and support of fellow weavers. If you have already jumped into the two-heddle waters, join in and share your experience.

How It Works

All rigid heddle weavers are invited to join us and weave a doubleweave throw during the month of September.

Suggested Pattern

If you are brand new to this technique, grab a copy of my new video, Double Your Fun that includes a copy of a small doubleweave throw.

Yarn

Cotton Clouds is offering kits in multiple colorways for the throw pattern supplied in the video. The first 15 kits purchased will come packaged in a Yarnworker project bag. Receive 10% off the kit if you order before August 15, 2016!

You do not have to use the pattern from the video, nor weave with any particular yarn. The only requirement to the weave-along is that you weave a doubleweave throw and you are ready to laugh.

Color four ways
Photo courtesy of Interweave

If you would like to participate, send me an email at worker@yarnworker.com with the subject line, Double My Fun. I will invite you to a special Facebook group for weave-along participants. The group will open August 25. We will also host a chat thread in the Yarnworker Ravelry group for folks who want to hang out there.

Schedule

Phase 1: September 1, 2016 – 8: Get Warped!
Phase 2: September 9, 2016 – 22: Weave!
Phase 3: September 23 – 29, 2016: Finish Strong!
Phase 4: September 30, 2016: Show Off Your Finished Throw!

I will check in daily to cheer you on and answer questions.

Share your progress on your favorite social media sites using the hashtag #doubleweavefun.

Drawing Prizes

During each phase, we will offer a drawing prize to one lucky participant in the Facebook group and in the Yarnworker Ravelry chat thread. At 7pm MDT on September 30, we will search Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook for the weave-along hashtag and offer a few bonus drawing prizes for those who post their finished throw using the hashtag #doubleweavefun.

About Your Hosts
Liz Gipson (that’s me) is a passionate rigid heddle weaver and lover of yarn. The author of the newly revised and updated, Weaving Made Easy, she helps weavers find ease in their weaving lives.

Cotton Clouds is run by weavers for weavers. Irene and Jodi are passionate about providing weavers, spinners, knitters, and crocheters high-quality cotton and other cellulose yarns. Cotton Clouds specializes in kits that offer you just the right amount of yarn, and then some, to weave dozens of rigid heddle projects. Their goal is to make your weaving life better.

Let’s make some happy heddles!

Liz



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22 thoughts on “Doubleweave Throw Weave-Along”

  1. Gah! That’s terrifying. I can never decide, when flying, if mail or checked luggage is safer for samples. When possible, they are in my carry-on. But sometimes there is just not enough room… I may have nightmares after reading this.

    Kudos for turning lemons into lemonade, though! The weave along sounds fun. 🙂

  2. So sorry about your samples, but the timing on this weave-along is perfect. I literally took a class on using 2 heddles last week.

  3. Can you provide a list of the materials that will be needed so I can determine if I just need the video or the whole kit offered by Cotton Clouds? Thanks much

    • To weave the pattern you will need a rigid heddle loom with a 2-heddle block, 15″ weaving width; 2 8-dent rigid heddles; 4 shuttles; 2 18’’ pick-up sticks. I used Cotton Fleece (80% cotton/20% merino wool, 215 yd/100 g skein, 980 yd/lb from brown sheep Brown Sheep in the following amounts and colors:

      Warp: Red, 160 yd; Berry, 160 yd; Plum, 42 yd. Weft, Rose, 98 yd
      Weft: Rose, 98 yd, Cherry 98 yd; Plum, 14 yd.

  4. Hi Liz, On the above list of materials you have listed 2 x Weft Rose 98yds, is that correct? I’m trying to ensure I have the amount of yarn handy from my own stash. Thanks in anticipation of the Weave along. Sheena

  5. Hi Liz.
    I have a 32″ width loom and 2 x 10dpi reeds. Please can you advise on the best weight of yarn to use. Also is it ok to just do a random yarn warp and weft or do I need to stick to the amount of colours you suggest? I have a serious amount of handspun that I’d love to use up!
    Thanks
    Sue

    • It is fine to adapt the pattern to use your own yarns or you can design your own throw. I do recommend if it is your first time warping two heddles the you use two colors. You want a yarn that wraps about 8-9 ends per inch, aiming for an open sett. Just be thoughtful when selecting which handspun to use that you don’t use anything that is too sticky or fuzzy as it can make it harder to get a clean shed.

  6. I bought the kit but did not receive any written directions as to how to proceed. I haven’t had
    A chance to view the entire DVD. Are the directions at the conclusion of the video?
    My experience with Facebook and Blogs is limited

  7. Hi! Ready to get started tomorrow! I selected the project to do in fron cotton clouds. Were we just to figure out the color pattern on our own or was there a color pattern to follow to do it as the example given? I’m pretty new at this so

    • Cotton Clouds worked up this chart for the alternate colroways. http://cottonclouds.com/doubleWeave/ What you will do is assign one of the alternate warp colors for each of the warp colors in the pattern (Red and Berry).

      Please also note that there are a few errors in pattern (?). I put a sticky thread with those fixes at the top of the Facebook group and Rav thread. Also just put up a new post with tips for warping.

  8. I am not ready to double weave yet but the idea intrigues me. Also I can’t afford to double up on 1 size of heddle. I was wondering if I can modify my 2 heddles sizes 8 and 12?

    • I have never tried mixing heddles, but the lining up of slots and holes and getting the right thread in the right place seems like it would a whole lot of not fun.

      There are plenty of beautiful things to make with with the heddles you do have!

      • Great idea about the use of used clothing, etc for thread or yarn. I’ll try that, it should pacify my husband because he has been looking askance (?) at my rather large supply on hand.

        I do have another problem. My products don’t seem to have the softness. I should be getting from my so soft yarn. Would it be heddle size?

        • If your fabric is stiffer than you would like it is most likely not sett quite right or you are beating the yarn too hard. Try a more open sett and a softer beat. This will give your yarn room to move and settle during wet finishing and your finished fabric will display more of the character of the yarn.

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