Geeking Out: Shuttles

Shuttles do just what their name implies. They shuttle the weft back and forth as you weave your cloth. Here are some ways to think about selecting a shuttle for your rigid-heddle weaving. Stick Shuttles Stick shuttles come with most rigid-heddle looms and are available in a wide variety of sizes. I like to pick […]

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Geeking Out: Warping Choices

My teaching philosophy is pretty much summed up this way: If it works, then do it. If it stops working, try something else. When it comes to warping, there are so many ways to get the job done—from the super speedy direct method that uses a peg, to the somewhat less speedy and versatile indirect method where […]

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Geeking Out: Joins

Starting or adding in new yarn can be done in so many ways. Here are three ways that I start and end a yarn and how I choose which one to use. I’m going to talk about sheds a lot, so if you want a refresher on them, click here. Tail Tuck The tail tuck […]

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Geeking Out: Doing a Loom Waste Audit

Most weaving patterns tell you how much loom waste they allow in the warp length within the project specs. In general, I allow 18”– 22” for the direct method, which requires that you tie onto the front apron rod and 22”– 26” for the indirect, which requires that you tie onto the apron rod in […]

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Geeking out on Sett Charts

Yarn selection and sett are at the heart of what makes woven cloth great. When pondering the question of sett, fabric design, and yarn substitution, an underused resource by rigid-heddle weavers is a sett chart. A sett chart is a list of yarns described in generic terms, their yardage, and a range of suggested setts. […]

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Geeking Out: Sheds

As I was editing the footage for the Yarnworker School’s next class on colorwork, it occurred to me that in weaving, there are many different kinds of sheds. A shed is the opening created when you lift or lower the heddle, creating a space to place the weft. The term is a variant of an […]

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