When to Use Which Finish

Finishing your fringe is like icing a cake. You can create a highly decorative look or something clean and simple. Beyond aesthetics, how do you know which technique is best for your specific circumstance? The purpose of finishing your fringe is to secure the weft and, if necessary, keep the yarn from fraying. Some folks […]

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Sett’s Effects

In A Weaver’s Guide to Yarn I start with sett. Understanding warp density’s effect on cloth is where the rubber meets the road, or in our case, the yarn meets the loom. Sett is the number of warp ends within an inch of the rigid heddle reed. Because rigid-heddle weavers often double up our ends in […]

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When, if ever, do I need a floor loom?

Rigid-heddle weavers regularly ask me this question or a variation on this theme, essentially wanting to know if they will reach a limit with their rigid-heddle loom. All looms have constraints. Syne Mitchell, a dedicated multi-shaft loom weaver and author of Inventive Weaving on a Little Loom, talks beautifully about the concept of constraints throughout her work. […]

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Teachers Gotta Teach or How to Become One

The past few months, I’ve had a number of sporadic conversations with weavers who would like to teach. For those who are interested in teaching others to weave, I thought I’d share my path and some tips for budding teachers. How I Became a Weaving Teacher My desire to teach was spurred on while I […]

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Geeking Out: Joins

Starting or adding in new yarn can be done in so many ways. Here are three ways that I start and end a yarn and how I choose which one to use. I’m going to talk about sheds a lot, so if you want a refresher on them, click here. Tail Tuck The tail tuck […]

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In my haste to cross things off my list, I started a new page as a blog post and the auto sender sent it to my blog subscriber list. Rushing to get things done, never pays. Sorry for the error and thanks for being a blog subscriber. I’ll have better content next time!   Liz

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Geeking Out: Doing a Loom Waste Audit

Most weaving patterns tell you how much loom waste they allow in the warp length within the project specs. In general, I allow 18”– 22” for the direct method, which requires that you tie onto the front apron rod and 22”– 26” for the indirect, which requires that you tie onto the apron rod in […]

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